No Space for ‘Otherness’

A hijra

A hijra (term for individuals in South Asia who feel neither male or female) at the annual Transgender Festival in Koovagam, India, in 2017. Photo: Lingeswaran Marimuthukumar, Flickr.

Av: Hanna Geschewski och Lauren Tropeano

What happens if you don’t behave like your gender ‘should’? Examples from Native American, Indian and Iranian cultures highlight that gender is diverse, but that the acknowledgement of gender variance doesn’t necessarily make us inclusive.

10 december, 2018, Article, English, Magazine

Who defines Native and Indigenous Populations?

Indigenous and native groups have become minorities in areas they’ve historically controlled. Photo: Arne Hoel/World Bank, Flickr.

Av: Fredrik Björksten

A couple of centuries ago, there was really no need to talk about either indigenous or native populations. People were then, by definition, all natives to where they were born and lived. However, as colonialism started to spread across the globe, people with roots dating back centuries was being pushed away for the sake of […]

26 oktober, 2018, Editorial, English, Magazine

“Break the silence, end the violence”

Another missing and murdered indigenous women's march in Minnesota, 2017 Source: Flickr

Av: Louise Gripenberg och Maria Ricksten

In the beginning of October 2018, another march for indigenous rights was held in Montreal, Canada. Hundreds gathered to remind politicians and police officers of the missing and murdered indigenous women. Canada’s long history of ethnic discrimination continues to echo today alongside the government’s failure to address this structural violence.

26 oktober, 2018, Article, English, Magazine

Indigenous Land in Ecuador Under Threat, Again

A Kichwa girl carrying her sack tumpline style near the Jondachi river in Ecuador.
Photo: Tomas Munita/CIFOR, Flickr.

Av: Johanna Caminati Engström och Lisa Elamson

In the last decade, progress has been made for the rights of the indigenous people of Ecuador. But despite a favourable legal context and numerous promises made by the government, their rights are still under threat by foreign economic interests.

26 oktober, 2018, Article, English, Magazine

How Indigenous Food Sovereignty Leads to Sustainability

A woman from an agrarian indigenous community in Puente Viejo, Guatemala. Photo: Ryan Brown/UN Women, Flickr.

Av: Carolina Yang

In the field of agriculture where production is the major appeal, a lens from the indigenous perspectives provides opportunities to relieve the unprecedented environmental stress imposed by industrial agriculture. Rather than over-simplified food system, sustainability will be more reachable if native wisdom is applied in celebration of diversity.

26 oktober, 2018, Article, English, Magazine

Is UNESCO’s work with indigenous people changing for the better?

Woman from the Mong Tribe in Chiang Mai, Northern Thailand, drawing designs on a piece of cloth.
Photo: Justin Vidamo, Flickr.

Av: Alexandra Håkansson Schmidt och Linda Sebbas

For the last decades UNESCO has been criticised for not tending to indigenous rights. The World Heritage convention has, despite its aim, resulted in devastating consequences for indigenous peoples. Signs of change in their work can be detected, but will it be enough?

26 oktober, 2018, Article, English, Magazine

The Flip side of Natural Resources: Brief stories from India and Alaska

Indigenous women collecting grass for their cattle in Kathonibari, Kaziranga National Park.
Photo: Eleonora Fanari & Pranab Doley.

Av: Hanna Geschewski och Vittorio Capici

The loss of Indigenous peoples’ natural resource base is often associated with rainforest clearing, dam projects and the mining industry. But it is not always the infamous multinational corporations that drive native peoples from their lands. Two examples from India and Alaska illustrate how public conservation policies and inter-indigenous conflicts threaten communities and identities.

26 oktober, 2018, Article, English, Magazine