The reverse of the green transition: Workers were buried in the cobalt mines

This is what it looks like in the Kaniola gold mine in the South Kivu region of Congo-Kinshasa. An example of very precarious working conditions. Photo: Enough Project. Source: Flickr.

Of: Elin Holm

The mining of metals used in technology often leads to severe human rights violations. In Chinese-owned mines in the Congo, people work in dangerous conditions - in some cases they have been locked up and buried in the mines, according to Richard Mukena, head of human rights at the Afrewatch organization. Olof Björnsson, researcher at Swedwatch, believes that the risks of human rights violations increase together with the extraction of metals.

December 28, 2021, Interview

Week 48: Vaccination distribution and apartheid review provoke reactions

- With a constantly mutating virus, it is important that everyone can take part in the vaccine. But that is not the case today, Zina Al-Dewany writes on Aftonbladet Ledare about the vaccine distribution in the world.

Of: Elin Holm and Julia Azzeddine

Sweden can do more to give more people access to vaccines, according to Zina Al-Dewany on Aftonbladet's editorial pages. The Church of Sweden's review of international law in Israel-Palestine was also discussed on Swedish debate pages during the past week.

December 6, 2021, Current debate

Difficult to motivate India to reduce climate emissions

A diesel-powered stone crusher next to a wind farm in the state of Chhattisgarh. Photo: Land Rover Our Planet / Flickr.

Of: Elin Holm

Rich countries are better placed to reduce their emissions, but India and other low-income countries will be hit faster and harder by climate change. At the same time, India has a unique position to build its welfare with green solutions from the beginning. But for that to be possible, it is also necessary for richer countries to live up to their promises.

November 4, 2021, Analysis