Water scarcity can cause conflicts in the Middle East

The issue of water resources has become absolutely crucial for countries in the Middle East and their security. Photo: VicunaR / Flickr.

Of: Julia Azzeddine

Crises and conflicts in the Middle East seem to have an almost permanent place in Swedish as well as international media reporting. What is rarely mentioned is the effect that water scarcity exacerbated by climate change has and will continue to have on the region's countries and any conflicts that may erupt as a result of the water issue in the future.

November 3, 2021, Analysis

Jakarta - A multimillion-dollar city built on swamps

Researchers believe that the estimated time for when the whole of Jakarta will be under water is 2050.
Photo: michaelsyoma, Unsplash

Of: Linnea Ljungar

It is the pumping of groundwater, together with the amount of land covered by concrete, that is one of the biggest factors in the sinking of the Indonesian capital Jakarta. Today, half of the inhabitants lack water in their homes, instead they get running water from groundwater pumps. To remedy the problem, the Indonesian government therefore proposes to move the capital to the Borneo Peninsula.

June 1, 2021, News

The SDGs in the Global North: Native Americans Lack Access to Water

Illustrating the Importance of Water in the Navajo Nation Photo: Dig Deep

Of: Alice Antoniou and Julia Mühlhauser

Covid-19 has increased awareness of the importance of sanitation globally; however, many face challenges meeting hygiene needs due to difficulties accessing clean water. Native Americans in the United States are particularly hard hit by this issue.

December 19, 2020, English, Magazine, News article, News

Clean water is a key goal in Agenda 2030

Women wash clothes in a river.

The earth's water resources must be managed both long-term sustainably and fairly, writes Viktor Sundman. Photo: Andrés Gómez / Pixabay

Of: Viktor Sundman

Water is essential for stopping hunger, maintaining good health and producing electricity and goods. But in 30 years, five billion people are expected to live in water shortages at least one month a year. How we handle water will be decisive for whether we will achieve the global goals in Agenda 2030, writes Viktor Sundman at the water institute SIWI.

April 29, 2020, Debate

New article series: Water and development

While soft-drink producers are making their sodas cheaper than ever, San Cristóbal in Mexico is running out of water. Photo: Pixabay.

Of: The Chancellery

Around 12 percent of the world's population uses 85 percent of the planet's water and around 1.1 billion people today live without access to clean water. FUF-Lund's new issue "Water and Development" highlights this important topic, with texts from China, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Sri Lanka, Jordan, the USA and Iran.

June 17, 2019, News

When Soda Replaces Water

While soft-drink producers are making their sodas cheaper than ever, San Cristóbal in Mexico is running out of water. Photo: Pixabay.

Of: Fredrik Björksten

In the mountains of southern Mexico lies the city of San Cristóbal with around 170,000 inhabitants. Located in one of the rainiest regions in the country, you might be surprised to learn that many neighborhoods in San Cristóbal only has running water two days a week. Luckily for the people, however, there's a local bottling […]

June 17, 2019, Editorial, English, Magazine

Water as a human right

Should the access to water be privatized or should it be free for everyone? Photo: United Nations Photo / Flickr.

Of: Kathrin Hegger

The supply of water, our most essential natural resource, will face shortages in the coming decades. Water was declared a human right by the UN in 2010. Therefore its accessibility should be ensured. In which way this will be done remains disputed.

June 17, 2019, English, Magazine, Opinion

Disastrous floods after prolonged droughts have challenged Iran

The historic Kashkan bridge was damaged in the recent flood. Photo: Ali Mostafanezhad.

Of: Seyyed Hasan Hosseini

Heavy rainfall and flooding in late March and early April 2019 affected millions of people in Iran, causing deaths, displacement and catastrophic damage to the infrastructure. This is happening while the country has long suffered from frequent droughts and adaptive management practices are not in place to deal with such fluctuations.

June 17, 2019, English, Guest piece, Magazine

Droughts and climate change are drivers of religious extremism

The overlapping causes of Lake Chad's humanitarian crisis pose a big challenge to the international community. Photo: EC / ECHO / Anouk Delafortrie, Flickr.

Of: Johanna Caminati Engström

As Boko Haram keeps making the news headlines and with 10.7 million people in urgent need of humanitarian assistance, the crisis in the Lake Chad basin is alarming. Drought, climate change, corrupt governance and religious extremism are just some of the overlapping challenges that the international community faces.

June 17, 2019, Article, English, Magazine