"If you only want to do one thing, it is to buy smaller clothes"

Aja Barber is a journalist, stylist and now a writer in sustainable fashion. Photo: Stephen Cunningsworth.

Of: Julia Carlzon

In previous articles from this week, we have read about the fast fashion industry's impact on people and the environment, and how slow fashion is the future. Aja Barber - journalist, stylist and author of the book "Consumed: The Need for Collective Change" - is convinced that all consumers bear a responsibility for the injustices created by the fashion industry.

November 26, 2021, Interview

Swedes' clothing consumption takes place at the expense of both people and the environment

The textile industry is estimated to be the second most polluted industry in the world, after the oil industry, according to UN News. Photo: PhotoMIX-Company. Source: Pixabay.

Of: Alice Eriksson

The clothing industry is the second most polluted industry in the world and the largest parts of the emissions for Swedes' consumption take place abroad. At the same time, the people who make clothes in factories work under terrible working conditions.

November 23, 2021, Analysis

From fossil-free to fossil-free

An oil field is an area in the earth's crust with great opportunities for economic gains. Image from California. Photo: Babette Plana. Source: Flickr.

Of: Marcus Karlén

Imagine that a country can undergo a rapid growth journey by giving up the fossil-dependent step. The idea of ​​traveling from a fossil-free society to a continued fossil-free one would mean a new world order and a major step for humanity's fight against climate change.

November 18, 2021, Reconnaissance

Indigenous peoples' knowledge can stop climate change

The Manobo people live on the Philippine island of Mindanao. The area where they live has a thriving biodiversity. Photo: Keith Bacongco. Source: Flickr.

Of: Elise Olsson

In a world where almost all of the earth's ecosystems have been disturbed by climate change and a quarter of our animal species are endangered, there are areas that have been preserved as if they were untouched - despite the presence of humans there. These areas often have a thriving biodiversity and ecosystems are even healthier than in nature reserves. The common denominator is that these are areas inhabited by indigenous peoples.

November 15, 2021, Report

Week 44: "Rich countries must contribute more to climate change"

Kiribati is one of the countries in the world that will be hit the earliest and hardest by climate change. Elevated sea levels could lead to Kiribati being completely covered by water in the coming decades. Photo: Eskinder Debebe / Flickr.

Of: Frida Lamberth Wallensteen and Hanne Karlsson

The UN climate conference COP26 in Glasgow has begun and the focus of the Swedish debate is on climate justice, global cooperation and young people's participation in the climate issue.

November 8, 2021, Current debate

Trade, development and climate: A future exploration in the wake of the crisis of hyperglobalization

Date and time: 10 Nov, 16:00 - 17:30

Sign up here! Welcome to a conversation with economist Stefan de Vylder about the future of the role of free trade in poverty reduction, the role of developing countries, the relationship between climate and free trade and future trade. Who are really the winners and losers in globalization? This and much more Stefan will tell about at Wednesday's digital seminar. The World Trade Organization (WTO) has contributed to […]

November 6, 2021, Calendar, Seminars

Difficult to motivate India to reduce climate emissions

A diesel-powered stone crusher next to a wind farm in the state of Chhattisgarh. Photo: Land Rover Our Planet / Flickr.

Of: Elin Holm

Rich countries are better placed to reduce their emissions, but India and other low-income countries will be hit faster and harder by climate change. At the same time, India has a unique position to build its welfare with green solutions from the beginning. But for that to be possible, it is also necessary for richer countries to live up to their promises.

November 4, 2021, Analysis

Week 41: Criticism of politicians ahead of the upcoming climate conference

"The world's leading politicians are doing far too little, far too late." Zina Al-Dewany writes about the climate issue in an editorial in Aftonbladet.

Of: Julia Carlzon and Marcus Karlén

For almost two weeks, starting on the first of November, the UN climate conference is taking place in Glasgow. Already now, politicians, interest groups and activists are choosing to profile themselves and present their ambitions and proposals regarding the fateful issue of the climate. With the international meeting on the Holocaust in Malmö, there has also been a debate about how society should fight anti-Semitism.

October 18, 2021, Current debate

Week 24: Debate on flight and migration on International Refugee Day

Of: The Chancellery

New figures from the UNHCR show that more than 80 million people are currently on the run and that the number has more than doubled in the last ten years. This week, the debate has revolved around several aspects of flight and migration and several debaters believe that the rich countries in the world must take joint responsibility for the situation. Democracy and climate linked to the Chinese regime have also been debated and Swedish companies should stop assisting dictatorships in oppressing LGBTQI people.

June 21, 2021, Current debate