Solway's mining industry in Guatemala - a repeat of colonial times

The company Solways' mining industry on Lake Izabal in Guatemala has devastating consequences for the environment and people in the area. Photo: NELO Mijangos. Source: Flickr.

Of: Villemo Warnerfjord

Is the colonial era over or has it just changed shape? Are the companies that ruthlessly exploit other countries' natural resources in the pursuit of greater riches the colonialism of our time? The company's Solway's mining industry in Guatemala has devastating consequences for the environment and for local communities.

April 27, 2022, Chronicle

Agricultural reform in Peru raises both hope and criticism

Peru has developed an agricultural reform that will serve as a support package for small farmers and to modernize agriculture in the country. But the reform has received both positive and negative reactions. Pictured: Potato harvest in Viraco. Photo: Leo Berggren-Lagercrantz.

Of: Leo Berggren-Lagercrantz

One in four Peruvians live on agriculture and many small producers in rural Peru struggle daily to survive. Now the government is starting the implementation of the new agricultural reform in the country - an initiative that has aroused both enthusiasm and criticism.

March 11, 2022, FUF-correspondents

We do not buy ourselves into a sustainable world

On Kungsgatan, one of Gothenburg's most popular shopping streets, shopping people often meet recruiters from various organizations. Photo: News Øresund / Jenny Andersson. Source: Flickr.

Of: Agnes Von Unge

Today, non-profit organizations often use member recruiters in the city to raise money for their businesses. At the same time, the change needed in the consumer society requires that organizations also change their fundraising strategies.

March 10, 2022, Chronicle

Week 7: EU can stop subsidizing undemocratic member states

Victor Orbán's Hungary is one of the countries that has opposed the EU imposing stricter democratic and legal conditions for the disbursement of EU funds. Photo: European Parliament. Source: Flickr. Link: https://www.flickr.com/photos/european_parliament/6720478185

Of: Elise Olsson and Idun Eklind

Last week's debate has, among other things, discussed the EU's decision to withdraw subsidies for countries that do not comply with the rule of law - and what this could mean for regimes such as Poland and Hungary. Furthermore, several debaters have criticized the Green Party's statement that investments in nuclear power can cause uranium dependence on Russia.

February 21, 2022, Current debate

Swedish fund money is invested in polluting oil giants

An oil spill has caused damage to animals and nature in the Ecuadorian rainforest where Mireya Gualinga and her people Kichwa live. Photo: Mike Gualinga.

Of: Elise Olsson

Several Swedish AP funds and several major Swedish banks are investing in companies that engage in deforestation and violate human rights in various parts of the world - something that affects the Amazon rainforest and indigenous peoples, among other things. "These companies are killing our planet. They are looting the last aid the planet can offer - and that's the forest," said Mireya Gualinga, a climate and indigenous activist from the Ecuadorian Amazon.

January 25, 2022, Interview

The cultivation of the future takes place below the surface

Seaweed can be a valuable resource in reducing world hunger and poverty, according to the UN Global Compact Sustainability Initiative. Photo: Canva.

Of: Frida Lamberth Wallensteen

Increased pressure on companies, individuals and governments to produce and consume sustainably has created an interest in alternative materials and food. One of the new shooting stars is the seagrass. As a multifaceted, climate-positive and a possible replacement for both burgers and plastics, companies have begun their investments along the continents' coasts. The question is what consequences industrial seagrass cultivation will have for local residents, ecosystems and international politics.

December 20, 2021, Analysis

Major boost for Sahel's ambitious reforestation project at COP26

The entrenchment of armed groups exacerbates conflict and instability in the Sahel region, leading to vast humanitarian suffering. Photo: Pablo Tosco / Oxfam / Flickr.

The world's largest reforestation project, known as the African Great Green Wall, received international attention and financial support at the UN's climate conference COP26 in Glasgow. Could this reforestation and revival project be the solution to underdevelopment and humanitarian suffering in the conflict-ridden Sahel region?

December 16, 2021, English, Magazine, News article

Gold and green forests - Gabon receives millions in support for sustainability work

"Ali Bongo prefers elephants and trees over people," locals commented on Gabon's president. More than half of all the world's remaining forest elephants live in the country's rainforest and for many inhabitants this means ruined harvests. Photo: Antony Trivet. Source: Pixabay.

Of: Beata Fylkner

When Gabon received money from Norway for its rainforest, the country became historic. After world leaders at the UN climate conference in the autumn promised $ 12 billion to combat deforestation, the model has been revived, but there is concern among locals about the socio-economic consequences of the initiative.

December 3, 2021, News

"If you only want to do one thing, it is to buy smaller clothes"

Aja Barber is a journalist, stylist and now a writer in sustainable fashion. Photo: Stephen Cunningsworth.

Of: Julia Carlzon

In previous articles from this week, we have read about the fast fashion industry's impact on people and the environment, and how slow fashion is the future. Aja Barber - journalist, stylist and author of the book "Consumed: The Need for Collective Change" - is convinced that all consumers bear a responsibility for the injustices created by the fashion industry.

November 26, 2021, Interview

Ten percent of the world's emissions come from the fashion industry

Protest against the Fast fashion industry in Berlin in September 2019. Photo: Stefan Müller. Source: Flickr.com.

Of: Melanie Alphonse

Since the early 2000s, the fashion industry has produced so-called "fast fashion" - trendy and short-lived garments that are quickly replaced by new trends, and the fashion industry today accounts for about 10 percent of global carbon dioxide emissions. This is the second part of Utvecklingsmagasinet's survey of the back of the clothing industry.

November 24, 2021, News