COP27: Meaningful participation and lost opportunities

Future COPs, as well as climate conferences and UN conferences in general, must address the gap between policy and people on the ground, according to Melanie Ridout, who works as Global Sustainable Innovation Manager and Climate Resilience Lead at Läkarmissionen. Photo of Doctors for Extinction Rebellion during COP26 protests. Photo by: Melanie Ridout.

Of: Melanie Rideout

Climate change is the inevitable culmination of the bad decisions we have made as a collective community. To address these challenges, we need to fundamentally change the architecture of our current system. That starts with ensuring meaningful participation, from the bottom-up, writes Melanie Rideout, Global Sustainable Innovation Manager and Climate Resilience Lead at Läkarmissionen (LM).

November 3, 2022, Debate, English

Redirect the Resources of Oil Companies, Military Firms and Banks

Oil and military companies are two key actors both contributing to global warming. Together they have the scale of resources necessary for systemic transformation, writes Jonathan Michael Feldman, who works in the Department of Economic History and International Relations at Stockholm University. Photo: Pxhere.

Of: Jonathan Michael Feldman

Equitable global development requires that basic needs are met in communities safe from the worst effects of war global warming, pollution, poverty, and pandemics. Problems persist because we lack a systematic response - but we can gain that if oil and military firms causeing problems are transformed into platforms for civilians, sustainable development through conversion and proactive investment campaigns aimed at universities and local investment actors, writes Jonathan Michael Feldman, who works in the Department of Economic History and International Relations at Stockholm University. 

June 30, 2022, English, Guest analysis

Left Party: One percent floor instead of settlements

Among other things, the Left Party wants to make the one percent goal a one percent floor that development cooperation must not be less than, and introduce a new climate aid that will be used to counteract the consequences of climate change. It writes the Left Party's aid policy spokesperson Yasmine Posio. Photo: Takver, Left Party. Source: Wikimedia Commons, Flickr.

Of: Yasmine Posio

With an acute climateödlägive and a serious humaniteär situation ivärlden it is not enough to as the government reduce areåthe end through the extensive avräthe knowledge one has now chosen to giveöra. Sweden has all möopportunities to be a sanctuary förmäpeople fleeing war and föpressure and at the same time stå up för and areånd policy värd the name. It writes the Left Party's aid policy spokesperson Yasmine Posio. 

June 13, 2022, Debate

Green Party: Do not reduce aid when needs increase!

An overwhelming majority of the world's poor live in rural areas and subsist on agriculture. Despite this, today only a small part of international aid goes to agricultural development and food production. The Green Party wants to change this, among other things by raising Swedish development assistance to 1,25 percent of GNI. Photo: Binoy Anthony / Green Party. Source: Pexels / Flickr.

Of: Maria Ferm

International aid is under threat. Despite the fact that we live in a time where development assistance is more important than ever, several parties in the Riksdag want to reduce it in various ways. Instead, the Green Party wants to both increase international aid to at least 1% of GNI and stand up for a humane refugee reception. It writes Maria Ferm, foreign policy spokesperson within the Green Party. 

June 3, 2022, Debate

This is how we Swedes can protect the Amazon and support its environmental fighters

Last year, the devastation of the Amazon in Brazil increased by 22 percent compared to 2020. This is the highest annual deforestation in 15 years. Photo: quapan. Source: flickr.

Of: Ebba Eriksson

The destruction of the Amazon, the lungs of the earth, threatens biodiversity as well as the rights and lives of indigenous peoples. Alarming reports of deforestation of an area as large as France and images of burning primeval forest arouse strong feelings in many and a desire to be able to help - and we in Sweden can be involved and influence.

March 1, 2022, Chronicle

Week 7: EU can stop subsidizing undemocratic member states

Victor Orbán's Hungary is one of the countries that has opposed the EU imposing stricter democratic and legal conditions for the disbursement of EU funds. Photo: European Parliament. Source: Flickr. Link: https://www.flickr.com/photos/european_parliament/6720478185

Of: Elise Olsson and Idun Eklind

Last week's debate has, among other things, discussed the EU's decision to withdraw subsidies for countries that do not comply with the rule of law - and what this could mean for regimes such as Poland and Hungary. Furthermore, several debaters have criticized the Green Party's statement that investments in nuclear power can cause uranium dependence on Russia.

February 21, 2022, Current debate

The cultivation of the future takes place below the surface

Seaweed can be a valuable resource in reducing world hunger and poverty, according to the UN Global Compact Sustainability Initiative. Photo: Canva.

Of: Frida Lamberth Wallensteen

Increased pressure on companies, individuals and governments to produce and consume sustainably has created an interest in alternative materials and food. One of the new shooting stars is the seagrass. As a multifaceted, climate-positive and a possible replacement for both burgers and plastics, companies have begun their investments along the continents' coasts. The question is what consequences industrial seagrass cultivation will have for local residents, ecosystems and international politics.

December 20, 2021, Analysis

Week 45: Debator calls world leaders hypocrites after the climate conference

Will the Glasgow climate conference really make a difference? That issue was hotly debated last week. Photo: Markus Spiske. Source: Unsplash.

Of: Sara Lannebo

Last week's debate revolved around the COP26 climate conference, which ended on Saturday. Climate debt, hypocrisy and Sweden's role in climate change were discussed on Swedish debate pages while world leaders were in the final negotiations at the conference.

November 15, 2021, Current debate

"The future of peace": launch and mingling

Date and time: 23 Nov, 17:30 - 19:30

Welcome to the launch of The Future of Peace, an anthology of mainly young writers, produced with the support of the Human Security Association and the Association for Development Issues (FUF). The anthology raises thoughts about how we create sustainable peace and security based on contemporary and future challenges and its solutions. It has been made possible with funding from the Folke Bernadotte Academy. Now you have the chance […]

November 8, 2021, Calendar, Seminars

Trade, development and climate: A future exploration in the wake of the crisis of hyperglobalization

Date and time: 10 Nov, 16:00 - 17:30

Sign up here! Welcome to a conversation with economist Stefan de Vylder about the future of the role of free trade in poverty reduction, the role of developing countries, the relationship between climate and free trade and future trade. Who are really the winners and losers in globalization? This and much more Stefan will tell about at Wednesday's digital seminar. The World Trade Organization (WTO) has contributed to […]

November 6, 2021, Calendar, Seminars