More violent attacks do not stop women human rights defenders in Guatemala

Maria Hernandéz participates in the peaceful resistance movement in the Ixquisis Micro-Region in Guatemala. Photo: Maria Hernandéz.

The work of female human rights defenders in Guatemala is fundamental to social change in the country, according to the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR). Despite the important role in society that women and women human rights defenders play in the country, their situation has become increasingly risky. This is what peace observer Emil Wenlöf writes in an analysis on Utvecklingsmagasinet.

January 4, 2022, Guest analysis

Mayan Struggles for Healthcare Access in Guatemala

Mayans in Guatemala continue to deal with discrimination 24 years after a violent civil war.
Photo: Flickr, by Daniel Mennerich

Of: Alice Antoniou

Guatemala continues to face challenges remaining from the Guatemalan Civil War, including high levels of poverty and inequality. Anne Kraemer, Executive Director of Wuqu 'Kawoq, shares how this manifests in the Mayan people's difficulties in accessing adequate healthcare services.

June 22, 2021, Interview, Magazine

The migrant caravan in the hope of a better life

Migrants in Central America

More than 7 people are part of the caravan of migrants fleeing poverty and violence in Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador. Photo: Alejandra Romo / UNHCR

Of: Märta Johansson

In recent weeks, the migrant caravan that left Honduras in mid-October this year has caused a great stir in the news media around the world. Despite the fact that Central Americans have migrated to the United States before, strong reactions have come from the President of the United States, Donald Trump, who uses threats and intimidation tactics to stop the migrants. At the same time, the caravan continues to strive with the hope of a better life.

November 20, 2018, FUF-correspondents

Trade agreements and seed laws hit small farmers hard

Of: Annelie Andersson and Edgardo García

The world's small farmers account for 70 percent of the world's food production, even though they only have access to 24 percent of the world's agricultural land. New trade agreements and seed laws also benefit large international companies and make it difficult to survive as smallholders, write the Latin American groups and the Latin American smallholder network CLOC-La Via Campesina Central America.

April 17, 2015, Debate