Israeli court order forces thousands of Palestinians to leave their homes

A large part of the Masafer Yatta area is to be used as a military training ground, which means that over 1000 Palestinians living in the area will have to leave their homes. Picture left: Israeli military ensure that the children cannot disturb the ongoing demolition of their school in the village of Isfay al-Fauqa. Photo: Kenneth, Companion Program. Image right: Field workers view debris from a demolition in Khirbet al-Fakhiet, one of the 14 villages in Masafer Yatta. Photo: Axel Sandberg. 

Of: Axel Sandberg

I May 2022 stated the Israeli Hhighest the court that a large part of the area Masafar On yacht on the southern West Bank ska work as militaryt practice field. This means that the nearly 1 Palestinians who live in the area will be forcibly displaced.

January 30, 2023, FUF-correspondents, Report

Independence from fossil fuels is crucial for human security

Nations today are faced with the Energy Trilemma; how to achieve energy security, energy equity and environmental sustainability – at the same time. And transitioning towards renewable forms of energy is essential to achieve human security worldwide, according to Marie Stjernquist Desatnik at Naturskyddsföreningen (the Swedish Society for Nature Conservation, SSNC). Image: A military attack on energy infrastructure. Photo by: Ecoaction.

Of: Marie Stjernquist Desatnik

The world's addiction to fossils fuel is the main contributor to the climate crisis, and it impacts peace and security worldwide. This was clearly demonstrated in 2022 by Russia's invasion of Ukraine. But why is it so difficult for nations to move away from fossil fuels? Part of it can be explained by the so-called energy trilemma, according to Marie Stjernquist desatnik, Senior Climate Policy Advisor at The Nature Conservation Society (the Swedish Society for Nature Conservation, SSNC). She argues That ttransitioning towards renewable forms of energy is essential to Achieve human security worldwide. 

January 17, 2023, Guest analysis, Guest piece, Magazine

Everything you need to know about the new foreign espionage laws

In November, the Riksdag voted through the new laws on foreign espionage – something that has met with strong criticism from both the media industry and former whistleblowers. Photo: Johannes Jansson. Source: Wikimedia commons.

Of: Vilma Ellemark

On January 1, the controversial foreign espionage laws came into force in Sweden. Critics fear that the laws make it more difficult for journalists and whistleblowers to report on wrongdoing in international collaborations. But how can espionage laws restrict the media? And why were the laws voted through despite the criticism? The development magazine explains what you need to know about the law changes.

January 13, 2023, Development magazine explains

You should know this ahead of Sweden's EU presidency

On 1 January 2023, Sweden takes over the presidency of the Council of the European Union. The development magazine helps you figure out what that means. Photo: Christian Lue. Source: Unsplash.

Of: Elianne Kjellman

From 1 January 2023 and six months ahead, the Swedish government takes over the presidency of the Council of the European Union. Some are hopeful and believe that the influential task will mean increased support for Ukraine, while others fear that it will be destructive to the EU's climate policy. The development magazine explains how the presidency works, and some things you should know to keep up with the debate on the subject. 

December 22, 2022, Development magazine explains

Actionable action is required to counter the illegal international arms flow

In order to regain security on our streets in Sweden, and a more peaceful world globally, it is more urgent than ever to both prevent and stop the illegal flow of weapons. This is written by Olle Thorell (S) and Magdalena Thuresson (M), members of parliament for the foreign affairs committee, as well as Karin Olofsson, secretary general of the Parliamentary Forum for light weapons issues. Photo: St. Louis Circuit Attorney's Office. Source: Wikimedia commons.

Of: Karin Olofsson, Magdalena Thuresson and Olle Thorell

The violence resulting from illegal weapons have devastating consequences worldwider – human, social and economic. For sustainable development and peace force is required to stop the illegal flow of weapons. Wednesday, December 14 special attention is paid to the issue in riksdagen when parliamentarians, civil society, experts and other representatives gather for the Parliamentarian Forum for Light Weapons-of questions (The Forum's) 20th anniversary seminar. 

December 14, 2022, Debate

Discussion evening about the protests in Iran

On December 14 at At 17.30, the FUF's local group in Gothenburg invites you to a discussion evening about the protests in Iran, which have the slogan "woman, life, freedom". The local group will begin with a short presentation of the country's history and significant events from 1950 to the present day. After that, we watch SVT's Foreign Office episode "Anger in Iran" together. After the episode [...]

December 7, 2022, Calendar, Local group, Educational activity

Week 48: Debaters engage in climate mood against the Swedish state

The Aurora youth movement has sued the Swedish state in public court for not treating the climate crisis as a crisis, something that has become the subject of debate over the past week. Pictured: Fridays For Future demonstration in Stockholm, February 2020. Photo: Frankie Fouganthin. Source: Wikimedia commons.

Of: Amanda Rossling and Karin Sjöstrand

The government's climate policy has been debated over the past week, as well as the youth organization Aurora's lawsuit against the state. The war in Ukraine has continued to be the subject of debate and DN's lead writer wonders if Sweden really supports Ukraine when Ukrainian women are forced into prostitution.  

December 5, 2022, Current debate

Hope for peace in war-torn Ethiopia after ceasefire agreement

For the past two years, the Ethiopian region of Tigray has been plagued by brutal fighting. Now the Ethiopian state and the Tigray People's Liberation Front (TPLF) have reached a ceasefire. Pictured: A destroyed tank in Edaga Hamus in Tigray, June 2021. Photo: Yan Boechat. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Of: Elianne Kjellman

One of the bloodiest conflicts of the 2000st century has been fought in Ethiopia since November 2020. A solution has seemed far away. But in early November came the surprising announcement that a ceasefire had been reached. Liisa Laakso, Senior Researcher at the Nordic Africa Institute, explains how the friction between the Ethiopian state and the People's Liberation Front in Tigray led to war - and how they have managed to reach a ceasefire.

December 2, 2022, Interview

Week 47: Debater on the scrapping of the one percent target: "Spiritless"

Dropping the one percent target is still the subject of debate on Swedish opinion pages. Photo: Frankie Fouganthin. Source: Wikimedia commons.

Of: Fredrik Govenius

The dropping of Sweden's one percent target for aid has been debated in several Swedish media over the past week. The protests in Iran have continued to be the subject of debate, for example when Ardalan Shekarabi (S) said that Sweden's government should tighten the sanctions against the country.

November 29, 2022, Current debate

The conflict between Rwanda and Congo-Kinshasa - this has happened

Congo-Kinshasa is trying to stop the advance of the M23 rebels, together with UN peacekeeping forces and troops from the East African Community. Photo: MONUSCO Photos. Source: Flickr.

Of: Agnes Durbeej-Hjalt

In recent months, tensions between Congo-Kinshasa and Rwanda have increased. The rebel group M23 has forced hundreds of thousands of civilians to flee in the eastern part of Congo-Kinshasa. Rwanda is accused of its denial of sponsoring the rebels, but the conflict between the countries has roots far back in time.

November 28, 2022, Development magazine explains