The UN recognizes the right to a healthy environment

The UN Human Rights Council in Geneva voted in favor of a new human right in the autumn - the right to a healthy environment. Photo: Elma Okic. Source: Flickr.

Of: Ulrika Granlund

The right to a healthy environment was voted through in the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva on October 8 - and the world now has a new human right. This right strengthens the link between climate and human rights, something that UN experts believe is important as we live in a world with increasing climate-related issues, such as desertification and large-scale oil projects.

December 21, 2021, Interview

Allegations continue to shed light on abuse in the aid sector

The development and humanitarian sector have long been aware of the issues with allegations of violence and abuses within the sector. Photo: Sanjitbaksji / Flickr.

Of: Emily Elderfield

Is the aid sector truly atoning for its sins? Great strides have been made, particularly over the last decade, to hold perpetrators of abuse and violence to account. Yet, new allegations of abuse show that we have a long way to go to keep everyone safe.

December 15, 2021, Chronicle, English, Magazine

The Libyan people are thirsty for democratic change

After 42 years of dictatorship and ten years of civil war, the popular will for democracy is strong in Libya. Pictured: Election of the Transitional Government Presidential Council at the Libyan Political Dialogue Forum in Geneva, February 5, 2021. Photo: Violaine Martin / UN Geneva. Source: Flickr.

Of: Andreas Klawitter

With the forthcoming presidential election on December 24, Libya, since Gaddafi's fall 10 years ago, is facing a crucial transition phase. Despite successes in holding municipal elections and the fact that the implementation of removing foreign mercenaries has begun, it is still uncertain whether decisive election laws will have time to enter into force on election day.

December 9, 2021, Interview

COP26: A successful climate conference or a greenwash festival?

The countries' agreements during the COP26 climate conference, in particular that on coal power, have received both positive and negative reactions. Image from the Neurath coal power plant in Grevenbroich, Germany. Photo: Catazul. Source: Pixabay.

Of: Alice Eriksson

On 31 October, the 26th UN Climate Conference COP26 kicked off. According to researchers, the meeting was successful after only a few days, while climate activist Greta Thunberg called the meeting a "greenwash festival". And it was not just climate activists who were disappointed when the countries of the world decided to simply reduce coal power instead of phasing it out completely.

December 7, 2021, News

Week 45: Debator calls world leaders hypocrites after the climate conference

Will the Glasgow climate conference really make a difference? That issue was hotly debated last week. Photo: Markus Spiske. Source: Unsplash.

Of: Sara Lannebo

Last week's debate revolved around the COP26 climate conference, which ended on Saturday. Climate debt, hypocrisy and Sweden's role in climate change were discussed on Swedish debate pages while world leaders were in the final negotiations at the conference.

November 15, 2021, Current debate

The Western world's continued silence about the bomb war in Libya

The conversation about how NATO bombings violated international law is still shrouded in obscurity. Pictured: Norwegian F-16 fighter jet at Souda air base after bombing mission in Libya in 2011. Photo: Metziker / Flickr.

Of: Andreas Klawitter

A little more than ten years have passed since the UN-sanctioned NATO intervention in Libya militarily forced a regime change and overthrew dictator Muammar Gaddafi. Utvecklingsmagasinet has interviewed the publisher of alliansfriheten.se, Lars-Gunnar Liljestrand, to shed light on how the military operation, of which Sweden was a part, violated international law on several different levels.

October 28, 2021, Interview

Concerns that not all countries will participate in an international climate conference

The pandemic has made it difficult for many people to attend the Glasgow climate conference in early November. Photo: geralt / Pixabay.

Of: Myra Pernvall

The United Kingdom is the organizer of the international climate conference COP26, which takes place in early November, and they believe that countries, together with civil society, must act united in the work against global warming. COP26 is supposed to be an arena for climate-promoting work, but the UN conference's opportunities to succeed have been questioned by the outside world even before it has even started.

October 26, 2021, FUF-correspondents

The third phase of development assistance

Date and time: 22 Apr, 17:00 - 18:15

Seventy-five years have passed since international development cooperation was born. After the end of the war in 1945, Europe was rebuilt and independent countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America invested in their future according to the conditions of that time. After the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, aid was transformed into a collaboration that touched on deeper social transformation and international partnerships. At the turn of the millennium, UN member states adopted the Millennium Development Goals, which fifteen years […]

April 8, 2021, Calendar, Seminars, Webcast

High time for a new type of global development

Photo: UNDP

Of: Josefin Pasanen

The new year comes with promises of large-scale Covid vaccination and a glimmer of hope that things can soon return to "normal" again. But there are many indications that it is precisely our "normal" way of life that has triggered the pandemic and the global socio-economic crisis that has come in its wake. The latest UN report on human development (HDR 2020) shows that the Covid-19 pandemic risks becoming a warning of what is to come, if humanity does not change course and work to restore balance on the planet.

January 29, 2021, Debate

Historical nuclear ban may come into force

In January 2021, an international agreement enters into force that bans nuclear weapons under international law. Photo: Tim Wright. Flickr.com.

Of: Amanda Lindell

On January 22, 2021, nuclear weapons may be banned. That after Honduras became the 50th state to adopt the UN Nuclear Weapons Convention. All nuclear weapons states have boycotted the agreement, but Svenska Fred's chairman Agnes Hellström believes that the agreement will still have major effects.

January 19, 2021, Interview