The Christian Democrats: Women's rights in focus in development aid policy

The fact that the Social Democratic government in this situation has decided that parts of the development assistance should be used in Sweden gives completely wrong signals about what international solidarity means. All this risks making an insecure world even more insecure. It writes Gudrun Brunegård, development policy spokesperson (KD). Photo: Bernard Gagnon. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Of: Gudrun Brunegård

Standing up for the one percent goal, women's education and poverty reduction are some of several attributes that characterize the Christian Democrats' development aid policy. With democracy as the highest guarantor of peace, values ​​such as human rights must be defended in the world through Swedish development assistance. It writes Gudrun Brunegård, bdevelopment policy spokesperson within the Christian Democrats.  

July 2, 2022, Debate

The Social Democrats: Sweden's development aid model works well

The government has announced that a certain part of the aid funds will be used to help the refugees who come to Sweden from Ukraine. But the fact that Sweden is one of the world's largest donors remains. It is written by Kenneth G Forslund, chairman of the Riksdag's Foreign Affairs Committee (S), and Anders Östberg, Member of the Riksdag and head of development policy (S). Photo: Ministry of Defense of Ukraine / Nathalie Beser / Swedish Parliament. Source: Wikimedia Commons / Socialdemokraterna / Sveriges riksdag.

Of: Anders Österberg and Kenneth G Forslund

We Social Democrats know that a world with great inequality, hunger and more conflicts is a more insecure world for all. Not least the covid-19 pandemic and Russia's war of aggression have shown this. The world is connected and when it burns in your neighbor's house, it also concerns you, whether it happens in Ukraine, Yemen or Sudan - therefore is development aid policy important and we Social Democrats see it as part of security policy. It is written by Kenneth G Forslund, chairman of the Riksdag's Foreign Affairs Committee (S), and Anders Östberg, Member of the Riksdag and head of development policy (S).

June 30, 2022, Debate

Left Party: One percent floor instead of settlements

Among other things, the Left Party wants to make the one percent goal a one percent floor that development cooperation must not be less than, and introduce a new climate aid that will be used to counteract the consequences of climate change. It writes the Left Party's aid policy spokesperson Yasmine Posio. Photo: Takver, Left Party. Source: Wikimedia Commons, Flickr.

Of: Yasmine Posio

With an acute climateödlägive and a serious humaniteär situation ivärlden it is not enough to as the government reduce areåndet through the extensive avräthe knowledge one has now chosen to giveöra. Sweden has all möopportunities to be a sanctuary förmäpeople fleeing war and föpressure and at the same time stå upp för and areåndspolitik värd the name. It writes the Left Party's aid policy spokesperson Yasmine Posio. 

June 13, 2022, Debate

The National Audit Office criticizes Sida for ambiguity in development assistance work

The National Audit Office's review of Sida's and the Government's work with Swedish development assistance shows, among other things, that it is unclear what motives and priorities lie behind parts of Sida's choice of forms of development assistance and partners. Pictured: A Tuareg man in the dunes of the Sahara Desert. Photo: Getty Images Signature. Source: Canva.

Of: Lina Kallio

Sida's choice of partners and forms of development assistance are unclear and the government's target images more difficult. This is the opinion of the National Audit Office after examining Sida and the government's work with Swedish development assistance.

June 3, 2022, Notis

Green Party: Do not reduce aid when needs increase!

An overwhelming majority of the world's poor live in rural areas and subsist on agriculture. Despite this, today only a small part of international aid goes to agricultural development and food production. The Green Party wants to change this, among other things by raising Swedish development assistance to 1,25 percent of GNI. Photo: Binoy Anthony / Green Party. Source: Pexels / Flickr.

Of: Maria Ferm

International aid is under threat. Despite the fact that we live in a time where development assistance is more important than ever, several parties in the Riksdag want to reduce it in various ways. Instead, the Green Party wants to both increase international aid to at least 1% of GNI and stand up for a humane refugee reception. It writes Maria Ferm, foreign policy spokesperson within the Green Party. 

June 3, 2022, Debate

Liberals: Democracy aid must be a priority

The Liberals want Sweden to set aside at least one percent of GNI for development assistance. In addition, the party believes that sometimes the additions require assistance - for example, to Ukraine right now. It writes the Liberals' foreign policy spokesman Joar Forssell. Photo: manhhai. Source: Flickr.

Of: Joar Forssell

For the Liberals, democracy, the rule of law and respect for human rights are the most important goals of aid. Swedish development assistance money should never go to finance those who oppress or counteract a democratic development. Free people in free societies build prosperity. In all contexts, it must be clear which side Sweden is on, namely those who are free. It writes Joar Forssell, foreign policy spokesman for the Liberals. 

June 3, 2022, Debate

Week 18: Debaters warn of cuts in aid

Instead of taking money from development aid to pay for refugee reception, Sweden should increase support for farmers in poor parts of the world, in order to counter a global food crisis. This is what Anna Tibblin, Secretary General of We Effect, and Anna-Karin Hatt, CEO of the Swedish Farmers' Association (LRF), write in a debate article in SvD. Pictured: Mauritania, which in 2012 was hit by a serious food crisis. Photo: Oxfam International. Source: Flickr.

Of: Alice Eriksson

Last week warned debaters for the consequences of reducing Swedish aid when the UN flags that billions of people in the world could be starved due to the war in Ukraine, while the question about nuclear weapons was a part of the continued NATO debate. 

May 9, 2022, Current debate

Five lessons from Russia's war in Ukraine on aid and development policy

In March, the Social Democratic government announced that costs for Swedish refugee reception would be deducted from development assistance. Magnus Walan, senior policy adviser at Diakonia, thinks the opposite - more aid to, among other things, promote democracy in the world, not less. He writes this in a guest analysis on Utvecklingsmagasinet. Photo: The Social Democrats. Source: Flickr.

Of: Magnus Walan

There is a debate going on about what lessons we can learn from Russia's war in Ukraine. Much of the debate is about NATO, but there are also lessons for Swedish foreign, development and development policy. How can politics become better at preventing conflicts and wars? Magnus Walan, senior policy advisor at Diakonia, lists five lessons.

April 11, 2022, Guest analysis

Week 14: Debaters critical of aid being used for refugee reception

"If Sweden is to continue to be seen as a pioneering country in development aid, we must be prepared to lead - not by creatively trying to circumvent the main purpose of development aid." Several leaders of Swedish aid organizations write about the government's announcement that Sweden's refugee reception should be able to be deducted from the aid. Pictured: informal settlements in Yemen. Photo: EU Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid. Source: Flickr.

Of: Fanny Andersson and Julia Lundén Azzeddine

The leadership continues to be largely dominated by political consequences stemming from Russia's war against Ukraine. But now voices are also beginning to be raised about Swedish development assistance and the need to also focus on other humanitarian issues.

April 11, 2022, Current debate

The XNUMX% target is an obstacle to effective development assistance

Of: Helena Antoni

The XNUMX% target leads to more efficient ways of conducting assistance, such as issuing guarantees, being prioritized because they generate few payments and therefore do not contribute to meeting the target. Sida should instead upgrade the guarantee instrument for effective assistance.
- It is becoming increasingly clear that the one percent goal is a black on the foot for effective development assistance activities, says Helena Antoni, responsible for development aid and development issues within the Moderates.

June 23, 2021, Debate