Researchers criticize planned bitcoin city in El Salvador: "It's playing with public money"

El Salvador's president Nayib Bukele wants to build a privately owned bitcoin city - something that is criticized by several researchers in the country. Photo: Presidencia El Salvador. Source: Flickr.

Of: Julia Carlzon

In El Salvador, the president is planning Watch to build "Bitcoin City ”, a utopia with zero income tax, zero property tax - and zero carbon dioxide emissions. The project is being sold as a way to benefit the national economy and promote innovation, but who really benefits from the bold idea? And what's so great about a privately owned city?

May 25, 2022, Report

El Salvador's president is criticized for cyber espionage and currency change

El Salvador's President Nayib Bukele has been controversial during his tenure, and the introduction of Bitcoin as the official currency in the country has diluted this. Photo: PresidenciaSV. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Of: Hanne Karlsson

El Salvador's President Nayib Bukele is facing massive criticism and is increasingly mentioned as a dictator. This after the development during the past year that has been fraught with the removal of judges from the Supreme Court, changes to the country's constitution and the introduction of Bitcoin as the official currency.

May 5, 2022, Analysis

Movie screening: Fly So Far - about sisterhood, resistance and the criminalization of women's bodies

Date and time: 7 Apr, 18:00 - 20:00

(Information in English below) On April 7 at 18.00 to 20.00 FUF Uppsala together with Sensus welcomes you to the screening of the documentary Fly so far / The Seventeen (2021) by Celina Esher! About the movie Teodora Vásquez was nine months pregnant when she fainted and suffered a miscarriage during her work shift. When she woke up in the hospital, she became […]

March 25, 2022, Calendar, Local group, Seminars, Educational activity

Music promotes peace among children and young people in El Salvador

The Soy Música project in the city of Suchitoto, El Salvador, May 2018. Photo: Musicians Without Borders

Of: Julia Carlzon

El Salvador is a country that, after a long history of injustice, is characterized by violence, crime and corruption. Not least the colonial era, the civil war and the influence of the United States have left their mark, and today both the police and gangs are spreading fear among the civilian population. Since 2017, the organization Musicians Without Borders with music as a tool has tried to create respite for the country's children, and spread values ​​about non-violence, belonging, and conflict resolution.

June 24, 2021, Interview

The president in a backward-facing cap evokes memories of the past

The young and popular President Nayib Bukele often wears a cap. Photo: CC0, via Wikimedia Commons.

Of: Hanne Karlsson

Since 2019, El Salvador has a new government, but the too-casual and trendy president has begun to show increasingly dictatorial sides. Several of the country's judges were recently dismissed and it undeniably looks like El Salvador is approaching an increasingly authoritarian government, something that Sweden should question, says Hanne Karlsson who is a student at the University of Gothenburg.

May 19, 2021, Debate

The migrant caravan in the hope of a better life

Migrants in Central America

More than 7 people are part of the caravan of migrants fleeing poverty and violence in Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador. Photo: Alejandra Romo / UNHCR

Of: Märta Johansson

In recent weeks, the migrant caravan that left Honduras in mid-October this year has caused a great stir in the news media around the world. Despite the fact that Central Americans have migrated to the United States before, strong reactions have come from the President of the United States, Donald Trump, who uses threats and intimidation tactics to stop the migrants. At the same time, the caravan continues to strive with the hope of a better life.

November 20, 2018, FUF-correspondents

Scars from the past pose a threat to democracy today

The memorial site for the victims in Srebrenica.

We need to remember history to stop today's threat to democracy, writes Anders Lindberg in Aftonbladet. Here is a memorial site after the massacre in Srebrenica in Bosnia in 1995. Photo: Jolle Visset (CC BY 2.0)

Of: Maja Sundstrand

Last week's debate spreads uneasily between several areas related to global developments - from environmental issues in international trade to antibiotic resistance. But what dominates the debate are issues that connect scars from the past and contemporary threats to democracy and human rights.

November 14, 2018, Current debate