Are countries underdeveloped or overexploited?

The organization "Black History Walks" organizes guided tours in London, where they highlight the colonial history that has built up the city and its streets. Photo: Leandra Pedretti.

Of: Leandra Pedretti

During a guided tour with the organization Black History Walks in London's financial district, I reflect on the assumptions that exist in the language we use when discussing development issues. What do we really mean when we talk about "underdeveloped" countries? What does it mean to be underdeveloped? I find my own answers to these questions in the colonial history of England.

November 30, 2021, FUF-correspondents, Chronicle

Universal basic income for low- and high-income countries

Campaign ahead of the referendum on national basic income in Switzerland 2016 where the people voted no. Photo: Michael von der Lohe, Flickr

Of: Kevin Perera

Citizens' salaries (also called basic income) are predicted to be able to alleviate economic decline and lead to favorable outcomes. Basically, it is about society offering residents an unconditional financial security, sufficient to cover basic needs. But will basic income achieve similar effects in low- and high-income countries? And if not, what differences are there to consider? There are many indications that low-income countries may find it difficult to reform poverty reduction, from aid to a reliable welfare system, while high-income countries have a much better starting point for using basic income for their own purposes.

April 8, 2021, Analysis

Panic can cost more than the pandemic

Person wears protective clothing and toilet paper

When panic strikes a society, it is rational for the individual to protect his loved ones. But it can prove to be counterproductive, the debaters write.

Of: Anna of Owl Glass, Johan Stellansson and Olof Sandkull

When the media reports deaths as a sports result, it is easy to lose your temper and panic. But perhaps panic is more dangerous than the pandemic itself. The measures to stop the infection will lead to increased hunger, water shortages and more violence around the world, write three debaters.

April 20, 2020, Debate

Increased inequality in the world has aroused debate about Sweden's development assistance

inequality

Electrification can be the key to achieving most of the goals in Agenda 2030, according to this week's debaters, when the focus is on inequality in the world.

Of: Amanda Wibne Romild

Last week, the UN Development Program (UNDP) published a report on human development, which begins with “Inequality. Evidence is everywhere ”. This has resulted in this week's debate focusing on the causes of inequalities and demands for change in Swedish development aid policy.

December 17, 2019, Current debate

A Europe for all - not just the richest

The Left Party wants to see an EU where class divisions are fought and where skin color has no bearing on how you are treated, writes Rebar Alnazar.

Of: Rebar Alnazar

The Left Party wants to see a Europe where democracy is self-evident, where class divisions are fought, where green technology is the way forward and where your skin color should have no bearing on how you are treated. We want a Europe for everyone - not just the richest, writes Rebar Alnazar.

May 24, 2019, Debate

Our welfare should not be based on the exploitation of people and nature in other parts of the world

Photo: Håkan Dahlström, FI, WikimediaCommons

Of: Jaime Gomez et al.

Feminist initiative advocates global justice and decolonization. We must challenge today's world order where the global north uses the global south. We want international cooperation to take place with mutual respect between equal parties and for the one percent target to be met without setting off costs for refugee reception in Sweden. It writes Jaime Gomez, Mats Ekenger and Maria Persson from the Feminist Initiative.

June 13, 2018, Debate

Time to realize economic principles for reducing inequality

Of: Elina Scheja and True Schedvin

Oxfam recently launched a report showing that 8 individuals own as much as half of the earth's population. The extreme inequality is impossible to justify, but the report blames outdated assumptions. Leading economists no longer believe that poverty can be eradicated through growth that "seeps down". If current economic thinking is put into use, an inclusive development is possible, write Elina Scheja and True Schedvin in Sida's chief economist team.

January 31, 2017, Debate