Researchers criticize planned bitcoin city in El Salvador: "It's playing with public money"

El Salvador's president Nayib Bukele wants to build a privately owned bitcoin city - something that is criticized by several researchers in the country. Photo: Presidencia El Salvador. Source: Flickr.

Of: Julia Carlzon

In El Salvador, the president is planning Watch to build "Bitcoin City ”, a utopia with zero income tax, zero property tax - and zero carbon dioxide emissions. The project is being sold as a way to benefit the national economy and promote innovation, but who really benefits from the bold idea? And what's so great about a privately owned city?

May 25, 2022, Report

Will the war in Ukraine be the spark that will ignite a new revolution in Tunisia?

Tunisia has been in a serious political crisis since President Kaïs Saïed dissolved the country's parliament, and civil society organizations in Tunisia are following developments in the country with concern, says Carin Norberg, former head of the Nordic Africa Institute and board member of Civil Rights Defenders. Photo: Houcemmzoughi. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Of: Carin Norberg

After a visit to Tunisia at the end of April, the image of a country in limbo emerges. The country is partly in a political crisis, partly in an economic crisis and the crises reinforce each other. Rising food prices and declining supply of wheat, which is a staple food in Tunisia, are therefore creating a very unstable situation ahead of the referendum on a new constitution announced by the president. It writes Carin Norberg, former head of the Nordic Africa Institute and board member of Civil Rights Defenders.

May 23, 2022, Guest analysis

China is everywhere

Karl-Anders Larsson, now retired and independent writer who is active in FUF's book club, presents the book "The Hidden Hand" - about China's economic strategies.

Of: Karl-Anders Larsson

All people today are affected by China's development. To understand the big issues today and in the future, it is necessary to study the Chinese system. This applies to economic and political issues and perhaps most of all climate and environment. China is always the biggest.

January 5, 2022, Review

How a Rwandan organization enables women, youth and refugees to leave poverty

58 year old seller Betty Mukarame is one of many women taking part in the organization Access to Finance Rwanda's (AFR) initiatives. Photo: FinScope 2016.

Of: Hibo Yusuf Ahmed

The concept of an inclusive economy has proved to make significant change in Rwanda, lifting millions out of poverty, according to the UN. The organization Access to Finance Rwanda (AFR), which is partly funded by the Swedish government, identifies market gaps and design interventions to close those gaps - making the market accessible to the most vulnerable in society. - Poor people stay poor because they are excluded from different markets, says Jean Bosco Iyacu, CEO of AFR.

December 30, 2021, English, Interview, Magazine

The debt crisis after the pandemic

Photo: John McArthur, Unsplash

Of: Rine Mansouri

The corona pandemic has hit everyone hard, but now another type of crisis is expected to hit low- and middle-income countries, a debt crisis of enormous proportions as a result of the pandemic's effects and strain on their already fragile welfare systems. One potential solution, according to the International Monetary Fund, is so-called Special Drawing Rights.

May 3, 2021, Report

Universal basic income for low- and high-income countries

Campaign ahead of the referendum on national basic income in Switzerland 2016 where the people voted no. Photo: Michael von der Lohe, Flickr

Of: Kevin Perera

Citizens' salaries (also called basic income) are predicted to be able to alleviate economic decline and lead to favorable outcomes. Basically, it is about society offering residents an unconditional financial security, sufficient to cover basic needs. But will basic income achieve similar effects in low- and high-income countries? And if not, what differences are there to consider? There are many indications that low-income countries may find it difficult to reform poverty reduction, from aid to a reliable welfare system, while high-income countries have a much better starting point for using basic income for their own purposes.

April 8, 2021, Analysis