Sustainable consumption and production – a major challenge for Sweden

Unsustainable consumption is one of the main causes of climate change - and that we thereby risk the stability of the planet, say Johan Rockström, professor of environmental science, and several other environmental scientists. Photo: dmncwndrlch/Pixabay, Twitter.

Of: Fanny Tegman Lindholm

Sweden's material footprint is increasing and sustainable consumption and production patterns are one of our biggest challenges. During In Almedal week 2022, there was a consensus among researchers about the negative impact of overconsumption on the climate. Strongly reduced carbon dioxide emissions and more circular flows of goods and services are examples of more sustainable consumption patterns, but the road there is complicated.

July 26, 2022, Almedalen - article, Report

Long-term aid can prevent hunger for girls and women in the Horn of Africa

Millions of people have suffered from hunger this year alone due to the increases in food prices in the world. Photo: Oxfam East Africa. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Of: Sandra Duru

21 million people in East Africa have been affected so far this year of hunger due to global food price increases, according to Hanna Nelson, policy manager at Oxfam Sweden. Regulating speculation on food prices and long-term aid can mitigate the consequences of food insecurity in the future – especially for girls and women who are hit hardest. 

July 25, 2022, Almedalen - article, Report

The organizations about development aid settlements: "The outside world is losing confidence in Sweden"

The umbrella organization CONCORD organized a breakfast mingling during the Almedal week to run the campaign #RäddaBiståndet on the streets of Visby together with various member organizations. Photo: Christina Wassholm, CONCORD Sweden.

Of: Hibo Yusuf Ahmed

Sweden's settlements on aid meant 40 percent cut annual budgets for several civil society organizations and their partner operations. Utvecklingsmagasinet has interviewed five organizations that warn that their partner organizations are losing confidence in Sweden and finding it difficult to maintain their work against, among other things, child marriage and female genital mutilation.

July 21, 2022, Almedalen - article, Report

One year after the Taliban took power: "Do not forget Afghanistan"

Women and girls are particularly vulnerable to repression under the Taliban regime, something Elham Kohistani, an activist, and Najiba Sanjar, a crisis coordinator and consultant, said at a seminar during Almedalen Week. Photo: Julia Lundén Azzeddine.

Of: Julia Lundén Azzeddine

One year after the Taliban took power in Afghanistan, the country is hard hit by poverty, famine, unemployment and dismantled health care. During Almedalen Week, several people discussed the crisis situation in the country. 

July 20, 2022, Almedalen - article, Report

This is how Sweden investigates international war crimes

Sweden cooperates internationally through both the EU and the UN to investigate war crimes. Photo: WiR_Pixs. Source: Canva.

Of: Elin Malmqvist

Russia's war on Ukraine is regularly reported on the news. We are reached by testimonies of awfulness war crimes that describe how Russian soldiers have raped and executed civilians as well as attacked hospitals and residential buildings in Ukraine. And Sweden takes a great international responsibility to conduct investigations into war crimes in the world.  

July 19, 2022, Almedalen - article, Report

Researchers criticize planned bitcoin city in El Salvador: "It's playing with public money"

El Salvador's president Nayib Bukele wants to build a privately owned bitcoin city - something that is criticized by several researchers in the country. Photo: Presidencia El Salvador. Source: Flickr.

Of: Julia Carlzon

In El Salvador, the president is planning Watch to build "Bitcoin City ”, anda utopia with zero income tax, zero property tax - and zero carbon dioxide emissions. The project is being sold as a way to benefit the national economy and promote innovation, but who really benefits from the bold idea? And what's so great about a privately owned city?

May 25, 2022, Report

After a ten-year drought - Chile's new president faces several challenges

Access to and ownership of water is a key issue when the Chilean constitution is being rewritten. Photo: Katiamenfe. Source: Pixabay.

Of: Sara Lannebo

When Chile's newly elected president Gabriel Boric takes office in March 2022, he will take over a changing country. Chile has been plagued by a decade of drought and the issue of water management is high on the agenda when the country's constitution is rewritten. But there is a difficult balance between promoting the economic interests of companies and reducing inequality in the country.

February 22, 2022, Report

Street art depicts the oppression in Northern Ireland - and in the world 


A mural on Falls Road depicting South African freedom fighter Nelson Mandela. He was and is much admired in Northern Ireland. Photo: Wilma Sörman Ivarzon.

Of: Wilma Sörman Ivarzon

The Irish Republican Army (IRA) was an active combatant in the conflict in Northern Ireland. The group is estimated to be directly responsible for around 1 deaths, of which 800 are civilians. Some see them as a brutal terrorist organization. Others believe that the IRA is a freedom fighter - whose solidarity extends across national borders to other rebels' struggle against oppression and imperialism.

January 20, 2022, FUF-correspondents, Report

Chile legalizes same-sex marriage - more countries are next

The LGBT legal organization Movilh launched the campaign that would eventually result in Chile's new legislation on same-sex marriage. Photo: Javier Ignacio Acuña Ditzel. Source: Flickr.

Of: Tilda Janbrink

On December 31, LGBTQ people cheered as the Chilean parliament, after a four-year process, finally voted in favor of legalizing same-sex marriage. Thus, Chile joined the now XNUMX countries where people of the same sex are allowed to marry each other.

December 16, 2021, Report

Indigenous peoples' knowledge can stop climate change

The Manobo people live on the Philippine island of Mindanao. The area where they live has a thriving biodiversity. Photo: Keith Bacongco. Source: Flickr.

Of: Elise Olsson

In a world where almost all of the earth's ecosystems have been disturbed by climate change and a quarter of our animal species are endangered, there are areas that have been preserved as if they were untouched - despite the presence of humans there. These areas often have a thriving biodiversity and ecosystems are even healthier than in nature reserves. The common denominator is that these are areas inhabited by indigenous peoples.

November 15, 2021, Report

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