New plastic law in Spain is criticized by marine biologist

The Spanish seas have a high concentration of so-called hotspots for biodiversity, which makes ecosystems extra vulnerable to external influences. Photo: Furious Germans. Source: Flickr.

Of: Jonna Erdös

Studies show alarming levels of plastic in the deep sea areas around the Spanish coast. New Spanish legislation will be implemented to reduce the use of plastic, but it is criticized for being misdirected and insufficient.

January 7, 2022, FUF-correspondents, Interview

The reverse of the green transition: Workers were buried in the cobalt mines

This is what it looks like in the Kaniola gold mine in the South Kivu region of Congo-Kinshasa. An example of very precarious working conditions. Photo: Enough Project. Source: Flickr.

Of: Elin Holm

The mining of metals used in technology often leads to severe human rights violations. In Chinese-owned mines in the Congo, people work in dangerous conditions - in some cases they have been locked up and buried in the mines, according to Richard Mukena, head of human rights at the Afrewatch organization. Olof Björnsson, researcher at Swedwatch, believes that the risks of human rights violations increase together with the extraction of metals.

December 28, 2021, Interview

The UN recognizes the right to a healthy environment

The UN Human Rights Council in Geneva voted in favor of a new human right in the autumn - the right to a healthy environment. Photo: Elma Okic. Source: Flickr.

Of: Ulrika Granlund

The right to a healthy environment was voted through in the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva on October 8 - and the world now has a new human right. This right strengthens the link between climate and human rights, something that UN experts believe is important as we live in a world with increasing climate-related issues, such as desertification and large-scale oil projects.

December 21, 2021, Interview

The Libyan people are thirsty for democratic change

After 42 years of dictatorship and ten years of civil war, the popular will for democracy is strong in Libya. Pictured: Election of the Transitional Government Presidential Council at the Libyan Political Dialogue Forum in Geneva, February 5, 2021. Photo: Violaine Martin / UN Geneva. Source: Flickr.

Of: Andreas Klawitter

With the forthcoming presidential election on December 24, Libya, since Gaddafi's fall 10 years ago, is facing a crucial transition phase. Despite successes in holding municipal elections and the fact that the implementation of removing foreign mercenaries has begun, it is still uncertain whether decisive election laws will have time to enter into force on election day.

December 9, 2021, Interview

Withdrawal of development aid could accelerate the humanitarian catastrophe in Afghanistan

This summer, protests were held around the world against the actions of the outside world during the Taliban's takeover of Afghanistan. Photo: Ehimetalor Akhere Unuabona. Source: Unsplash.

Of: Julia Azzeddine

During the intensive news reporting on the Taliban regime's takeover of Afghanistan this summer, Sweden's aid authority Sida announced that they will end million payments in aid for development projects in the country. - It will destroy development programs concerning education, health and more, says Anders Fänge, Afghanistan expert and board member of the Swedish Afghanistan Committee.

December 8, 2021, Interview

The presidential election in Zambia - a victory for democracy

Zambia's peaceful transfer of power in this year's political elections gives hope to other countries on the continent. Photo: Canva.

Of: Linnea Boström

At the end of the summer, presidential elections were held in Zambia. Against expectations, the opposition candidate Hichilema took home the victory and the country became overnight a prime example of a well-functioning, political transition in Africa. - The peaceful transfer of power made me feel very proud to be a Zambian, says Pezo Mateo-Phiri, who works at the Swedish embassy in the capital Lusaka.

December 1, 2021, Interview

"If you only want to do one thing, it is to buy smaller clothes"

Aja Barber is a journalist, stylist and now a writer in sustainable fashion. Photo: Stephen Cunningsworth.

Of: Julia Carlzon

In previous articles from this week, we have read about the fast fashion industry's impact on people and the environment, and how slow fashion is the future. Aja Barber - journalist, stylist and author of the book "Consumed: The Need for Collective Change" - is convinced that all consumers bear a responsibility for the injustices created by the fashion industry.

November 26, 2021, Interview

They create journalism on the terms of women in Colombia

Laura Gil is a program consultant for International Media Support's 1325 program in Colombia, which will challenge gender stereotypes and portray people whose voices are rarely heard in the media. Photographer: Holman Salgado.

Of: Agnes Von Unge

This year, the Nobel Peace Prize drew attention to the connection between journalism and peace. The international organization International Media Support shows through its activities around the world that this connection extends beyond just the fight for freedom of expression. In Colombia, they have an ongoing program to make women feel fairly represented in the media. There, women are not only interviewed for articles - they are also part of the editorial staff.

November 17, 2021, Interview

Land grabbing destroys unique landscape in Romania

A Swiss meat company has purchased, or otherwise claimed, large portions of arable land in the Hârtibaciu Valley in Romania. Photo: Martin Wallmen.

Of: Lisa Busch

Land grabbing and international companies buying up land in Romania are destroying one of the places in the world with the greatest biodiversity and creating problems for the people in the countryside. This is the opinion of biologist Joe England and landscape architect Viktoria Luft, who works to promote sustainable agriculture and small-scale agriculture in the country.

November 16, 2021, Interview

Still unstable in Nagorno-Karabakh

The Armenian Cathedral Ghazanchetsots Cathedral in the city of Shushi. The city has great cultural and historical value for both Armenians and Azerbaijanis, and it was taken back by Azerbaijan during the war of 2020. The cathedral was subjected to shelling during the fighting. Photo: Robert Levonyan Source: Unsplash.

Of: Sara Lannebo

One year after the end of the war between Armenia and Azerbaijan, the situation in the Nagorno-Karabakh breakaway region remains unstable. With historical trauma, harsh tone and disputed boundaries, a solution seems far out of sight. - This is not only a conflict between regimes, but also between societies, says Thomas de Waal, author and analyst at Carnegie Europe.

November 10, 2021, Interview