The war in Ukraine has become a catastrophe for millions of people

Anne Poulsen is the Nordic director of the UN's World Food Program (WFP) - one of the world's largest humanitarian organizations that provides millions of people with nutrition every year. She warns that the number of hungry people in the world is rising - and that the war in Ukraine is making the situation worse. Photo TV: World Food Program. Photo by: Logan Abassi. Source: United Nations / Flickr.

Of: Elise Olsson

Even before the war in Ukraine broke out, large parts of the world were in a famine, where the number of hungry people in the world had increased from 135 million to 276 million in just two years. This is a figure that will continue to rise in the shadow of the war. - We must start taking from the hungry to give to the starving, says Anne Poulsen, Nordic director of the UN's World Food Program.

May 31, 2022, Interview

The Chilean people are hoping for political change

Gonzalo Artigas and his sister Javiera Artigas hope for political change in Chile. Photo: Gonzalo Artigas.

Of: Villemo Warnerfjord

In recent years, Chile's policies have been met with huge protests, a new constitution and a new president. Dissatisfaction has attracted people to the polls and now great challenges await left-wing politician Gabriel Boric. The Chilean people have woken up and now they want to see a change, says the 29-year-old Chilean Gonzalo Artigas.

March 9, 2022, Interview

Cobalt - a tricky road to sustainable transport

Most of the world's cobalt production is extracted in Congo-Kinshasa. Photo: Enough Project. Source: Flickr.

Of: Melanie Alphonse

The extraction of the minerals cobalt and lithium has increased in connection with the demand for electric cars. Several companies are interested in opening mines in northern Sweden, something that risks threatening the Sami right to land and culture. At the same time, multinational mining companies are exploiting child labor and violating human rights in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the world's largest exporter of cobalt.

February 24, 2022, Interview

Swedish fund money is invested in polluting oil giants

An oil spill has caused damage to animals and nature in the Ecuadorian rainforest where Mireya Gualinga and her people Kichwa live. Photo: Mike Gualinga.

Of: Elise Olsson

Several Swedish AP funds and several major Swedish banks are investing in companies that engage in deforestation and violate human rights in various parts of the world - something that affects the Amazon rainforest and indigenous peoples, among other things. "These companies are killing our planet. They are looting the last aid the planet can offer - and that's the forest," said Mireya Gualinga, a climate and indigenous activist from the Ecuadorian Amazon.

January 25, 2022, Interview

The decline of democracy in the world disadvantages the protests in Kazakhstan

Democracy is currently facing several setbacks in the world - something that may have hampered the success of the protests in Kazakhstan, according to Ashok Swain, professor of peace and conflict at Uppsala University. Pictured: Presidential Palace in the Kazakh capital Nur-Sultan. Photo: Francisco Anzola. Source: Flickr.

Of: Elise Olsson

Poverty, corruption and large economic income gaps - it is not just the shock rise in petrol prices in Kazakhstan that has triggered a violent riot in the country. And even though this type of uprising can be a starting shot for democratization, the weakened democracy in the world can also be an obstacle to the starting shot, says Ashok Swain, professor of peace and conflict at Uppsala University.

January 18, 2022, Interview

New plastic law in Spain is criticized by marine biologist

The Spanish seas have a high concentration of so-called hotspots for biodiversity, which makes ecosystems extra vulnerable to external influences. Photo: Furious Germans. Source: Flickr.

Of: Jonna Erdos

Studies show alarming levels of plastic in the deep sea areas around the Spanish coast. New Spanish legislation will be implemented to reduce the use of plastic, but it is criticized for being misdirected and insufficient.

January 7, 2022, FUF-correspondents, Interview

The reverse of the green transition: Workers were buried in the cobalt mines

This is what it looks like in the Kaniola gold mine in the South Kivu region of Congo-Kinshasa. An example of very precarious working conditions. Photo: Enough Project. Source: Flickr.

Of: Elin Holm

The mining of metals used in technology often leads to severe human rights violations. In Chinese-owned mines in the Congo, people work in dangerous conditions - in some cases they have been locked up and buried in the mines, according to Richard Mukena, head of human rights at the Afrewatch organization. Olof Björnsson, researcher at Swedwatch, believes that the risks of human rights violations increase together with the extraction of metals.

December 28, 2021, Interview

The UN recognizes the right to a healthy environment

The UN Human Rights Council in Geneva voted in favor of a new human right in the autumn - the right to a healthy environment. Photo: Elma Okic. Source: Flickr.

Of: Ulrika Granlund

The right to a healthy environment was voted through in the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva on October 8 - and the world now has a new human right. This right strengthens the link between climate and human rights, something that UN experts believe is important as we live in a world with increasing climate-related issues, such as desertification and large-scale oil projects.

December 21, 2021, Interview

The Libyan people are thirsty for democratic change

After 42 years of dictatorship and ten years of civil war, the popular will for democracy is strong in Libya. Pictured: Election of the Transitional Government Presidential Council at the Libyan Political Dialogue Forum in Geneva, February 5, 2021. Photo: Violaine Martin / UN Geneva. Source: Flickr.

Of: Andreas Klawitter

With the forthcoming presidential election on December 24, Libya, since Gaddafi's fall 10 years ago, is facing a crucial transition phase. Despite successes in holding municipal elections and the fact that the implementation of removing foreign mercenaries has begun, it is still uncertain whether decisive election laws will have time to enter into force on election day.

December 9, 2021, Interview

Withdrawal of development aid could accelerate the humanitarian catastrophe in Afghanistan

This summer, protests were held around the world against the actions of the outside world during the Taliban's takeover of Afghanistan. Photo: Ehimetalor Akhere Unuabona. Source: Unsplash.

Of: Julia Lundén Azzeddine

During the intensive news reporting on the Taliban regime's takeover of Afghanistan this summer, Sweden's aid authority Sida announced that they will end million payments in aid for development projects in the country. - It will destroy development programs concerning education, health and more, says Anders Fänge, Afghanistan expert and board member of the Swedish Afghanistan Committee.

December 8, 2021, Interview