Spring Brings Disappointment for Afghanistan's Women

Since the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan in August 2021, they have - among other restrictions for women - restricted girls' possibility to go to school. Photo: Kajsa Waaghals.

Of: Arzo Bahar

Eight months after the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan, hope is paused as new policies restricting women are confirmed. These include an ongoing ban of secondary school for girls and increasingly stringent male escort requirements. Arzo Bahar, the president of the Female Staff Association of the Swedish Committee for Afghanistan, describes her experience as a working woman and mother, and the fears she has for her daughters.

April 26, 2022, English, Guest chronicle, Guest piece, Magazine

When we put an end to corporate human rights abuses, I will rejoice

The EU has recently adopted a bill regarding corporate responsibility for human rights and the environment, but the bill is not enough to be able to change the rules of the game, says Hanna Nelson, policy manager at Oxfam Sweden and advisor to the think tank Global Challenge. Pictured: Female tea pickers in Assam, India. Photo: Roanna Rahman.

Of: Hanna Nelson

“The critical tone does not work here in Sweden. This is actually something positive, something historical. ” These are comments that have landed in my inbox since the European Commission presented its bill on corporate responsibility for human rights and the environment. But the law that would protect human rights for workers around the world is now proposed to apply only to 1 percent of companies. Why should we rejoice then? It writes Hanna Nelson, policy manager at Oxfam Sweden and advisor to the think tank Global Challenge.

April 4, 2022, Guest chronicle

Human rights activist Sultana: "Western Sahara must be free"

Western Saharan activist Sultana has had her eye removed as she protests against the Moroccan occupation of Western Sahara. This is what Lena Thunberg, editor of Tidskriften Västsahara, writes in a guest column. Photo: Jan Strömdahl.

Of: Lena Thunberg

Western Saharan human rights activist Sultana Khaya has been under house arrest for more than a year in Morocco-occupied Western Sahara. Her crime? She waves the flag of Western Sahara. This is what Lena Thunberg, editor of Tidskriften Västsahara, writes in a guest column.

March 31, 2022, Guest chronicle

Functional law is a necessity in climate work

People with disabilities have a special vulnerability to increased climate change, according to the organization MyRight. Pictured: a wheelchair on the ground in Kathmandu, Nepal. Photo: MyRight.

Of: MyRight

People with disabilities are almost never included in the work for a better climate, nor do they receive information about climate change in available formats. Without information, it is difficult to be involved and change. It writes MyRight, the Swedish disability movement's organization for international development cooperation.

January 31, 2022, Guest chronicle

Who will scoop and who will row?

Rising sea levels make the island nation of Kiribati one of the countries in the world most exposed to climate change. Photo: United Nations Photo. Source: Flickr.

Of: Sofia Jonson

We waited a long time for the international climate summit in Glasgow, the summit that would lead the way to a sustainable society. But now afterwards, when I sit on my bike in the rain, it feels like I'm the only one who cares, why is that? It writes sustainability specialist Sofia Jonson.

January 18, 2022, Guest chronicle

That is why many Palestinians do not believe in a two-state solution

Two police officers arrest a 14-year-old boy despite being in a grocery store during a clash between Palestinians and Israeli police. Photo: Carl Bradshaw.

Of: Carl Bradshaw

How long should one stick to a strategy that overturns rather than helps? Among Palestinians in the West Bank, few believe in a two-state solution, and the Oslo Accords are seen as a tool for Israeli annexation rather than peace.

January 14, 2022, Guest chronicle

Peace begins with meeting as human beings

Israeli settler Rabbi Hanan Schlesinger (left) and Palestinian peace activist Khaled Abu Awwad (right) share a vision to bring more people together. Photo: Ebba Åkerman.

Of: Ebba Åkerman

"Go home as a strong supporter of Palestine. Go home as a strong supporter of Israel. Go home as a strong supporter for a solution. To support both peoples is to support peace ”. The call comes from Rabbi Schlesinger - a former New York resident, Israeli settler, peace activist and co-founder of the organization Roots.

January 13, 2022, Guest chronicle

When will Palestinian children be able to go to school in peace and security?

The children at the school between the villages of as-Sawyia and al-Lubban ash-Sharqiya, the West Bank, meet heavily armed soldiers on the way to school every day. This is what such a day can look like. Photo: Fanny Lingqvist.

Of: Fanny Lingqvist

Every day when the children go to school along the highway, they are met by heavily armed soldiers. Some days the soldiers aim their weapons at the children, other days they block the way to school. On particularly bad days, children are arrested and abducted in military vehicles, often in front of their schoolmates or family members who are desperately trying to get them released.

January 11, 2022, Guest chronicle

I can never accept that girls grow up with extinguished dreams

- When families fall deeper into poverty, it is the girls who have to pay the price, writes Jennifer Vidmo, Secretary General of ActionAid Sweden, on International Girls' Day. Pictured: Naima, 7 years old (left), and Mushtak, 8 years old (right), in Burao, Somaliland. Photo: ActionAid, Karin Schermbrucker.

Of: Jennifer Vidmo

Today is International Girls' Day. A day to celebrate all the girls? No, a day to stand up for girls' rights - which is violated and diminished every day and exposes young girls to a life that we can all agree on is completely unreasonable. In poverty and not least in the wake of pandemics where families are destitute and without hope, girls are most at risk of being hit the hardest, writes ActionAid's Secretary General Jennifer Vidmo in a guest column.

October 11, 2021, Guest chronicle

More than 250 people have been killed since the military coup, and now activists are leaving Yangon

Of: Kristina Jelmin

- Why do I feel like a criminal on the run? We have not done anything wrong and yet we are forced to flee. These monsters, they should be ashamed. My friend writes to me at the same time as she gets in the car that will take her away from the violence in Yangon to the relative security in the countryside. Next to her she has her mother, it is to her home village they are on their way. If they are stopped in a roadblock, the official explanation is that she will escort her mother home. But the truth is that she herself must get out of Yangon in order not to risk being caught.

March 22, 2021, Guest chronicle