The Peace Wall divides the people of Belfast

The so-called Peace Wall divides western Belfast, with the mountain Black Mountain in the background. Photo: Wilma Sörman Ivarzon.

Of: Wilma Sörman Ivarzon

Although Northern Ireland has been peaceful on paper for 23 years, the parties to the conflict have remained divided. Some argue that it is because of the so-called peace wall, which divides Republican and loyalist areas and thus prevents meetings and integration. Others say that the wall is a vital protection against aggression from the other side, and that if it is torn down, Belfast may once again be marked by violence, death and terror.

January 21, 2022, Analysis, FUF-correspondents

More violent attacks do not stop women human rights defenders in Guatemala

Maria Hernandéz participates in the peaceful resistance movement in the Ixquisis Micro-Region in Guatemala. Photo: Maria Hernandéz.

The work of female human rights defenders in Guatemala is fundamental to social change in the country, according to the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR). Despite the important role in society that women and women human rights defenders play in the country, their situation has become increasingly risky. This is what peace observer Emil Wenlöf writes in an analysis on Utvecklingsmagasinet.

January 4, 2022, Guest analysis

The cultivation of the future takes place below the surface

Seaweed can be a valuable resource in reducing world hunger and poverty, according to the UN Global Compact Sustainability Initiative. Photo: Canva.

Increased pressure on companies, individuals and governments to produce and consume sustainably has created an interest in alternative materials and food. One of the new shooting stars is the seagrass. As a multifaceted, climate-positive and a possible replacement for both burgers and plastics, companies have begun their investments along the continents' coasts. The question is what consequences industrial seagrass cultivation will have for local residents, ecosystems and international politics.

December 20, 2021, Analysis

Russian military company approaches Mali - has been accused of war crimes

Wagner works, for example, with training local forces and protecting important people. That is the basis for a possible contract with Mali. Pictured - the UN peacekeeping mission MINUSMA in Mali. Photo: MINUSMA. Source: Flickr.

Of: Linnea Ljungar

In recent years, Russian military companies have gained more power on the African continent. One of these companies is The Wagners Group - which in connection with previous involvement in the Central African Republic has been accused of war crimes. At the same time, the military company's progress raises questions about how future security policy will be shaped.

December 2, 2021, Analysis

Swedes' clothing consumption takes place at the expense of both people and the environment

The textile industry is estimated to be the second most polluted industry in the world, after the oil industry, according to UN News. Photo: PhotoMIX-Company. Source: Pixabay.

Of: Alice Eriksson

The clothing industry is the second most polluted industry in the world and the largest parts of the emissions for Swedes' consumption take place abroad. At the same time, the people who make clothes in factories work under terrible working conditions.

November 23, 2021, Analysis

Swedish companies are fueling corruption in developing countries

Buildings in Arenastaden in Solna, Stockholm, where the headquarters of many large companies are located - including Telias. Photo: Kaj Schmidt. Source: Flickr.

Of: Villemo Warnerfjord

The western world must help so-called "failed states" to build democratic societies and fight corruption - at the same time as large western companies fertilize it and are involved in extensive corruption scandals.

November 19, 2021, Analysis

The war in Tigray must be resolved as three different conflicts

- An increased understanding of the various actors' separate dispute issues contributes to an insight into the obstacles that exist for a quick solution, writes, David Larsson Gebre-Medhin, PhD in peace and conflict research, in a guest analysis on the conflict in Ethiopia.

Of: David Larsson Gebre-Medhin

The Tigray war in Ethiopia has taken a new turn and rebels are now threatening the capital Addis Ababa. Although Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed recently strengthened his mandate through success in this year's elections to the federal parliament, he now risks losing power. And with each passing day, suffering is growing - so far the war has resulted in thousands of deaths, widespread ethnically motivated abuses against civilians, violence that has displaced more than 2.5 million people and a famine that has affected an estimated 400 and threatens another seven million people.

November 18, 2021, Guest analysis

Migrants deported from the US and Mexico: "They are pressured to take more dangerous routes"

Tens of thousands of migrants have set up camp on the US-Mexico border while awaiting asylum. Photo: Christian Palma. Source: Flickr.

Of: Hanne Karlsson

Tens of thousands of refugees and migrants, mainly from Haiti, have been deported from the United States and Mexico in the past month. Many of them have been forced to leave the countries without being given the opportunity to seek asylum. Several human rights organizations claim that this is both discriminatory, illegal treatment and something that violates migrants' human rights.

November 11, 2021, Analysis

The election in Qatar - a step towards democracy or a game for the galleries?

Qatar's emir Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani will in future share power with an advisory body, but he still has a veto on all important issues. Photo: Ahmad Thamer Al Kuwari. Source: Flickr.

Of: Tilda Janbrink

As next year's host nation for the World Cup, Qatar has caught the eye of the world. In early October, the country went to the polls for the first time ever - but the population's actual influence over politics is still limited.

November 9, 2021, Analysis

Difficult to motivate India to reduce climate emissions

A diesel-powered stone crusher next to a wind farm in the state of Chhattisgarh. Photo: Land Rover Our Planet / Flickr.

Of: Elin Holm

Rich countries are better placed to reduce their emissions, but India and other low-income countries will be hit faster and harder by climate change. At the same time, India has a unique position to build its welfare with green solutions from the beginning. But for that to be possible, it is also necessary for richer countries to live up to their promises.

November 4, 2021, Analysis