The Peace Wall divides the people of Belfast

The so-called Peace Wall divides western Belfast, with the mountain Black Mountain in the background. Photo: Wilma Sörman Ivarzon.

Of: Wilma Sörman Ivarzon

Although Northern Ireland has been peaceful on paper for 23 years, the parties to the conflict have remained divided. Some argue that it is because of the so-called peace wall, which divides Republican and loyalist areas and thus prevents meetings and integration. Others say that the wall is a vital protection against aggression from the other side, and that if it is torn down, Belfast may once again be marked by violence, death and terror.

January 21, 2022, Analysis, FUF-correspondents

"The future of peace" - a new anthology with voices for sustainable peace and security

The anthology "The future of peace" contains 14 texts on how we create sustainable peace and security. It is free and can be downloaded further down the page.

Of: The Chancellery

How can children be included in the work for sustainable peace? How are climate justice and global health related to peace work? These and many other important issues are addressed by different voices for sustainable peace and security in our anthology The Future of Peace. FUF's network for global sustainable peace and security has together with the Human Security Association been involved […]

September 29, 2021, Activity

The XNUMX% target is an obstacle to effective development assistance

Of: Helena Antoni

The XNUMX% target leads to more efficient ways of conducting assistance, such as issuing guarantees, being prioritized because they generate few payments and therefore do not contribute to meeting the target. Sida should instead upgrade the guarantee instrument for effective assistance.
- It is becoming increasingly clear that the one percent goal is a black on the foot for effective development assistance activities, says Helena Antoni, responsible for development aid and development issues within the Moderates.

June 23, 2021, Debate